What if you can’t work but SSA denies your disability claim?

| Apr 27, 2021 | SSDI

Social Security Disability Insurance is a federal program designed to help residents of Georgia and other states who have worked qualifying jobs and are now unable to work for at least a year. SSDI does not fully replace earned income, and there is a maximum limit to how much each eligible person can receive each month.

Does the Social Security Administration determine your disability, or does your doctor make that determination?

The Social Security Administration uses your medical diagnoses, conditions, doctors’ reports and a federal formula to determine if you’re disabled. You can be disabled and receive disability payments from other sources and still be denied benefits by the SSA. The process is complicated, so you would benefit well from seeking counsel on the matter.

If you’re eligible, your SSDI payments will be based on a host of factors with the final decision being made by the SSA. The SSA only pays for total disability; it does not pay for partial or short-term disability. If your condition has an expectation of recovery within 12 months, your SSA application can be denied. The denial does not mean you are not disabled, but your disability won’t last long enough to meet the SSA requirement.

What if your disability comes and goes, resulting in chronic depression?

To be approved for SSDI, your disability must prevent you from working 12 or more months continually. Many disabilities come with other chronic disabling conditions.

The application process can get confusing because the SSA decides which disabling condition is primary, resulting in a denial of benefits for many Americans. A qualified attorney may help you gather the proper medical evidence to prove your case.

How to win your disability appeal and get your benefits

One of the most effective tools to win your SSDI case is the help of a qualified disability attorney. An attorney may ensure that your application includes your background and what you’re going through. Your attorney may explain how the Social Security disability process works and help you get the benefits that you and your family deserve.